Seattle Takes the First Step

The city of Seattle, Washington has taken the first step in combating plastic pollution by banning plastic straws and utensils.

Seattle is now the first major U.S. city to ban single-use plastic items in an effort to combat the global plastic pollution crisis.

A handful of other cities and nations across the world have implemented similar bans as the evidence of human pollution becomes overwhelming.

Delhi, the capital city of India, introduced a ban on all forms of disposable plastics at the beginning of this year.

In April, the United Kingdom announced that it would ban all sales of single-use plastic straws and cotton swabs as early as next year.

And Taiwan has put forth an ambitious blanket ban on single-use plastics that is designed to eliminate disposable plastic use by 2030.

Other countries are combating the plastic pollution crisis in other ways — Sweden, for example has such efficient recycling programs that they have begun importing waste from other countries.

Stories and video footage of marine animals dying as a result of ingesting plastic products have increased dramatically over the last year as the world is on track to have more plastic in the ocean than fish by 2050.

The United States, which produces 30% of the world’s overall waste, consumes at least 500 million plastic straws per day, which is enough to wrap around the circumference of the earth 2.5 times.

In other words, every single day the U.S. uses enough plastic to encompass the globe two and a half times.

While it is highly unlikely that we will see a federal ban on single-use plastics under the current administration, people can still make a difference by lobbying their local and state representatives to implement municipal and statewide bans on straws, bags, and other plastic items.


To find a complete list of your representatives, go to CommonCause.org.

To learn more about plastic straw pollution and how you can get involved, go to TheLastPlasticStraw.org.

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