Water Contamination Study Finally Released

The results of a long-suppressed study on the nationwide water contamination crisis have finally been released.

Emails exchanged between members of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that were leaked last month showed that members of both departments were attempting to suppress the results of a study that showed widespread chemical contamination in the nation’s water supply.

The contamination stems from the use of chemicals called PFOA and PFOS which are used in firefighting foam and Teflon.

Some of the most contaminated areas are close to military bases where the chemicals are routinely used in training exercises.

In the emails, an OMB member said that if the results were to get to the public, it would cause a “public relations nightmare.”

The EPA even went so far as to bar journalists from sitting in on a meeting about the crisis last month to keep the information from reaching the public.

Why?

Because the study found that these chemicals, PFOA and PFOS, cause significant damage to human health at much lower levels than previously thought — meaning that these chemicals aren’t nearly as safe as we’ve been led to believe.

According to a report to Congress issued by the Department of Defense (DOD), which uses the chemicals extensively, by March of this year there were already 126 confirmed sites at which chemicals were measured at dangerously high levels, most of them in close proximity to a military base.

These chemicals are known to cause a host of health issues including cancer, thyroid complications, and developmental delays.

We now know that damage to a person’s health can be inflicted at levels as little as one-tenth of the amount previously thought to be safe.

To make matters worse, these chemicals are bio-resistant, meaning they don’t break down in your body over time but rather remain in your system indefinitely.

 

 

 

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