So We Are in Yemen, After All

The New York Times reported last Thursday that a small force of Green Beret special forces were deployed last year to the Saudi-Yemeni border to assist Saudi forces in subduing Yemeni rebels.

The reports, provided by both European and U.S. officials, are in complete contradiction with previous White House statements asserting that U.S. aid was limited to intelligence-sharing, strategy, and aircraft refueling.

The troops are reportedly helping Saudi forces to locate and destroy local Houthi rebel missile sites with absolutely zero public awareness or input.

The Saudi-led war in Yemen has killed more than 10,000 people and displaced another two million.

Famine, cholera, and diphtheria plague the country, which has been under siege for three years and has seen most of its health and sanitation services and infrastructure destroyed.

As we have discussed, despite the fact that the U.S. bears the responsibilities of enabling the Saudi forces to wage their war and actively supporting them in it, our government has actually gone and made it harder for Yemeni refugees fleeing U.S.-funded terror by revoking their Temporary Protected Status (TPS), making it illegal for them to remain in the U.S.

This is also yet another example of the expansion of the executive power to engage in war without the express consent, or even awareness, of congress.

It appears that this situation may force a vote on the newly proposed version of the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) in congress, with co-author of the draft Senator Tim Kaine (D-VA) citing the New York Times report as further evidence of a need to revisit the legislation.


To read Iron Triangle Press’ recent coverage of the developing Temporary Protected Status situation, click here.
To learn more about the Authorization for Use of Military Force, click here.

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